Where are we now?

Where are we now?

Camomile is all mended after the lightening strike. After a summer circumnavigating Borneo Camomile is back in Puteri harbour in Johor Bahru, Malaysia. We plan to cruise up the west Malaysian coast to Langkawi and spend Christmas in Rebak marina.

  1. Happy New Year to you both – love reading about your on going adventures & seeing your beautiful photos.
    This year we are heading for Turkey which we are looking forward to.
    Take care & happy safe sailing
    Lots of love
    Liz & Julian xx

  2. francesca zanette

    Hallo Bill,
    THis is Francesca Zanette, we briefly worked together in Worthing at IAD, at the Fiat project.
    I was one of the technical translators on your team, with Patrick (can’t remember his surname), Rachel and Patrizia.
    THis might surprise you and you might not remember me, but I was enlarging my business contacts and decided to look you up. A long time has passed by, and I see you have indeed changed career!
    I wish you and your wife a wonderful trip, and ejoy NZ! I lived there a loooong time ago, and still harbour it in my hearth.
    Kind Regards,
    Francesca (now living in Paris)

    • Hello Francesca, what a delight to hear from you I remember that time and the support you gave me with great fondness. It was Patrick Berrera you were thinking of perhaps but I’m afraid I have not been able to track him down. Mabey you will have some luck and if you find him be sure to send him my regards. NZ is fantastic isn’t it, we have had a really great time here.
      What are you doing and how did you come to live in Paris and what have you been up to in the meantime?

  3. Hi Guys,
    good to see you made it back to Fiji. I am sitting here in Wellington earning sailing tokens in the freezing cold. Bill, I have found out that the boom on Wildflower II is some 4 feet shorter than it should be which probably did not help our performance in light winds last year. I have managed to pick up a Seldon boom that is the right length and just need t addpat the gooseneck to fit it to the mast. Should be good as it has single line reefing for all 3 reefs as well. I will probably do that at the same time I adapt the aft arch to fit the 2 D400 wind generators…. Ah the list goes on. Wishing you fair winds and a small chance we may meet up later in the season when I head out to Fiji for a holiday with some friends who are cruising there. Best regards Paddy and Anna

  4. Glad to see that you are all well! Great photos of Norman – very envious as we sit here with a storm raging outside. Love to you all – and safe sailing!
    Sharon & Nigel

  5. What a wonderful blog! We found you while doing research on the Westerly Sealord. We are trying to decide between the Sealord and the Conway. There is one of each for sale in our geographic location. The Sealord looks to be such a comfortable boat for two people. Do you find that it is easy for you to handle together? I am also curious about how you find its motion at sea. Regardless, your boat is beautiful!

    • Hello Melissa, I am so glad you like the blog, it’s always nice to know that someone looks at it.
      Sealord vs Conway – I am obviously biased but I like the more modern layout of our boat and she is well set up for short handed sailing. The extra room her beam gives is probably what sold us on her but the Conway has a good reputation for being sea kindly. We have no problem with Camomile in that respect except when we are punching a big sea on a hard up to the wind beat she can occasionally slam but, I don’t know, perhaps the Conway does too. Tough call but good luck with your choice and, if you have any questions or want more information please don’t hesitate to ask.

      all the best

      Bill

  6. Thank you very much, Bill. We are reading your blog with interest. I am very concerned with having a boat I can handle myself so that Mike will be able to rest below when I’m at the helm. The Sealord we are looking at on Saturday has a slight crack in the foredeck where that babystay is attached and when I first saw it I thought this might be from overtightening of the stay. I read your post about the same kind of problem on your boat and must say we are very impressed with your ability to fix that. One question about that: did the boat suffer water intrusion because of the over tightening? There has been water damage in the forward head of this boat, which is very close to that stay, and I am wondering if the water is coming from the foredeck.
    It’s a tough choice because the Conway we are looking at is in sail-a-way condition while the poor Sealord has been left to languish at the dock. The owner has all but abandoned the boat so there is likely a long list of projects to be done before we could sail, much less go ocean voyaging. Still, I love that Sealord and would be willing to put in the time for the right boat.
    Many thanks for your opinions.

    • Hello Melissa, we found it fairly easy to set up Camomile for short handed sailing. For us, with all the lines already lead into the cockpit, it only involved fitting single line reefing so that sail could be doused without leaving the cockpit, putting a stackpack on the main so we didn’t disappear under miles of canvas every time the main came down and fitting an autopilot control at the binnacle. We rarely hand steer the boat on passage, preferring to use either the autopilot or Hydrovane and this leaves both hands free for whoever is on watch to look after the lines and anything else that needs attending to. Like admiring the view! As you know the Sealord has a spade rudder which is light and responsive so not too much of a handful unless you have way too much canvas up. Long story short, a good inboard mounted autohelm is important.
      The baby stay sounds like a problem as all the lowers on the single spreader rig do a lot of work and therefore need to be in good condition because loosing one of these shrouds is not fun (see http://yachtcamomile.wordpress.com/2010/03/05/on-to-galapagos/ ). It is possible that the Sealord you are looking at has a similar weakness to Camomile where the bulkhead to which the stay attached is not suitably bonded at the bottom where it joins the hull. There are two easy tests to check this. Firstly look at the deck and, using a long steel rule or flexible piece of timber running longitudinally along the boat’s centre line at the mounting of the stay, see whether the deck looks as if it has bulged upwards. Secondly look at the bottom of the forepeak door where it meets it’s threshold and see if it has a gap like the one in my technical article on chain plates. If you have both of these and signs of water ingress (which may lead to softening of the balsa wood deck core) then sorting it out would significant project. I would be happy to help with advice based on my experience on this job but, if you decide to go ahead with this particular boat, then I’d recommend getting a professional quote because, if nothing else, you can ensure that you get a suitable reduction for all the hassle.
      Good luck with whatever you decide to do and don’t hesitate to come back if you want more, I am also on Skype a lot so, if you want a chat about it, just let me know and we’ll set it up.

      all the best

      Bill Redgrove

    • Hello Melissa, we found it fairly easy to set up Camomile for short handed sailing. For us, with all the lines already lead into the cockpit, it only involved fitting single line reefing so that sail could be doused without leaving the cockpit, putting a stackpack on the main so we didn’t disappear under miles of canvas every time the main came down and fitting an autopilot control at the binnacle. We rarely hand steer the boat on passage, preferring to use either the autopilot or Hydrovane and this leaves both hands free for whoever is on watch to look after the lines and anything else that needs attending to. Like admiring the view! As you know the Sealord has a spade rudder which is light and responsive so not too much of a handful unless you have way too much canvas up. Long story short, a good inboard mounted autohelm is important.
      The baby stay sounds like a problem as all the lowers on the single spreader rig do a lot of work and therefore need to be in good condition because loosing one of these shrouds is not fun (see http://yachtcamomile.wordpress.com/2010/03/05/on-to-galapagos/ ). It is possible that the Sealord you are looking at has a similar weakness to Camomile where the bulkhead to which the stay attached is not suitably bonded at the bottom where it joins the hull. There are two easy tests to check this. Firstly look at the deck and, using a long steel rule or flexible piece of timber running longitudinally along the boat’s centre line at the mounting of the stay, see whether the deck looks as if it has bulged upwards. Secondly look at the bottom of the forepeak door where it meets it’s threshold and see if it has a gap like the one in my technical article on chain plates. If you have both of these and signs of water ingress (which may lead to softening of the balsa wood deck core) then sorting it out would significant project. I would be happy to help with advice based on my experience on this job but, if you decide to go ahead with this particular boat, then I’d recommend getting a professional quote because, if nothing else, you can ensure that you get a suitable reduction for all the hassle.
      Good luck with whatever you decide to do and don’t hesitate to come back if you want more, I am also on Skype a lot so, if you want a chat about it, just let me know and we’ll set it up.

  7. Hello Bill, Many thanks for your informative response! We are looking at the boat again tomorrow, having seen her first in March, and will print out your response and take appropriate tools to have a look. Our yacht broker, a knowledgeable fellow when it comes to sailboats, is coming with us so we will have an extra pair of eyes. We would definitely get a professional survey on this boat should we make an offer. Your experience will be valuable to us should we be lucky enough to buy a Sealord. We also are on Skype so that may be useful in the future.
    I will let you know how it goes, and, again, many thanks! Some day we will be sailing the seas ourselves and perhaps will meet up at a lovely anchorage somewhere, on twin Sealords! Or on a Sealord and a Conway. We shall see.

  8. Bill, just wanted you to know we looked at that Sealord today and finding your blog really saved the day. There is definitely a gap between the bulkhead and the hull, to port as you enter the V berth. The gap is about 12-13 mm. We looked at the boat in the pouring rain, and there is water intrusion everywhere. When we looked at this vessel in March, everything looked great on the inside. Now, a month into our rainy season, all of the cushions are completely ruined, soaked through with water. The wood is beginning to mold in several areas. I hate to walk away from this boat but we may do so. It’s really going to be a project. Our broker knows a good surveyor so if we decide to put in a bid on the boat, it will not be without a complete going over. It’s very sad to see a vessel in that condition. Unfortunately it is the only Sealord for sale on the west coast of the U.S.

    • It is a shame to hear that she is in such poor condition. I saw the photos which make her look great of course and she comes with some of the basics like HF radio, davits boarding platform and so on. If it makes you feel any better I also noticed that she has her original engine which will be probably be getting unreliable and difficult to source parts for now. First rule of sailing away, make sure you have a really good engine.
      Good luck with your ongoing search

      Bill

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