Monthly Archives: February 2017

South Africa to the Caribbean – day 39

Our position at 10.00 (11.00 GMT) Tuesday 28th February was 08 04S
024 21W
on a course of 303T with less than 1 meter swell and sunny blue skies.
Our 24 hour run from 10.00 yesterday to 10.00 today was 137 miles. Average 5.76kts much better than the last few days. We have 544 miles to go to Fernando de Noronha,

The wind picked back up in the morning and we were flying along all day with speeds of 5.7kts and 6.2kts and 7kts recorded and it continued through the night. Our average speed has gone up which is pleasing.

We saw our first birds yesterday. During this leg of the journey, apart from Antares sailing alongside us on the first day, we’ve absolutely nothing – no ships, no fishing boats, no other yachts, no dolphins or whales, nothing. As the horizon is only 6 miles away there could easily be some thing out there but we haven’t seen it.

Bill had the portable generator on all day yesterday charging up the batteries with the watermaker on filing the water tanks.

As I said yesterday it’s getting really hot and sticky. It will be like this for the next week or two until we cross the equator.

I have the nickname ‘Sailing Mum’ because I run the net and worry about my ‘ducklings’ if they don’t check in. I’ve been put to the test over the last few days because one of the yachts on the net suddenly stopped checking in and had previously been very chatty. I left it 3 days then decided to contact St Helena port control to see what they suggested. It was passed through to Falmouth MRCC who have located the vessel which is still on its way to Trinidad. They said it was good to report it and better to be safe than sorry and I can only assume his SSB has suddenly broken. I was worried because they are an elderly couple and he hasn’t been well lately. We have to hope all is well on board.

Last night we had lamb rumps with mint sauce and Bisto gravy (no you can’t I brought it out here from the UK) the very last of the potatoes 😦 and carrots, I’ve still got 4 left. I also made apple crumble with the tinned apples I bought in St Helena, and custard, it was delicious. Fortunately there’s enough left over for seconds tonight. All well on board. 🙂

The blog goes through to facebook but we can’t see facebook or your comments. I’ll catch up with them all in the Caribbean. If you wish to email us please use mdqf6 @ sailmail.com (take out the gaps) Stay safe everyone.

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South Africa to the caribbean – day 38

Our position at 10.00 (11.00 GMT) Monday 27th February was
09 55S
022 22W
on a course of 297T with less than 1 meter swell and sunny blue skies.
Our 24 hour run from 10.00 yesterday to 10.00 today was 114 miles. Average 4.75kts 😦 We have 679 miles to go to Fernando de Noronha,

We’ve been out here a week now and making good speeds. In 7 days we’ve covered 962 miles averaging 5.7kts, not bad for a little Westerly. Yesterday the wind held despite the forecast saying it was going to lighten over the weekend. Bill’s gribs had the ‘blue hole’ moving west in front of us so hopefully we’ll ‘push’ it out of the way.

It was the dark moon last night and without the glimmer of moonlight the stars lit up the night sky with an eerie loveliness from horizon to horizon. Planets and galaxies could be seen with the naked eye; a fantastic sight. Should get a slither of new moon tonight.

We had a heavy shower at midnight and you could see a weak front crossing over from behind us. The clouds took the wind again and our speed dropped a couple of knots causing the boat to roll and the sails to flap. After that we averaged a frustratingly 4.5kts over night losing some of our ground. It’s gradually picking up this morning and the skies have cleared.

It’s getting really hot as we get closer to the equator. I’m back to sailing in bikini and shorts with bare feet, even at night although I sometimes put a light tee shirt on.

I cooked chicken curry last night adding a few tinned potatoes. Disguised in the curry sauce they weren’t too bad.

All well on board. 🙂

The blog goes through to facebook but we can’t see facebook or your comments. I’ll catch up with them all in the Caribbean. If you wish to email us please use mdqf6 @ sailmail.com (take out the gaps) Stay safe everyone.

South Africa to the Caribbean – day 37

Our position at 10.00 (11.00 GMT) Sunday 26th February was
09 45S
020 33W
on a course of 300T with a 1 meter swell and sunny blue skies.
Our 24 hour run from 10.00 yesterday to 10.00 today was 125 miles. Average 5.2kts We have 791 miles to go to Fernando de Noronha,

Nothing new, wind still from the south east, still F3, still got twizzle rigged, occasional shower takes away the wind leaving rolly seas before the wind comes back gradually during the next hour.

The exciting thing for me was at 6.30pm yesterday we had 866 miles to go to the Fernando islands which is half way between St Helena and Fernando, that’s also a quarter of the way from St Helena to Barbados and a third of the way from Cape town to Florida. So we’re gradually getting there. I had a glass of wine to celebrate.

It’s looking more likely that we won’t stop at the Fernando islands. Bill is keeping an open mind until we get closer but we’ve heard through another cruiser who’s just been there that the anchorage fee and landing fees for us would amount to about US$123 a day, add to that the beach permit to the NP beaches plus eating a nice meal out and we would probably get through about 500 in 3 days which we don’t have. There are supposed to be supplies there but I’m sure they would also be expensive. We’ve seen lots of islands so don’t feel we have to stop at these but we are watching the weather and the wind to see what happens. If the wind dies it would be crazy to motor on but if the wind holds it would be silly to stop.

I cooked chicken hotpot yesterday with aubergines and carrots. I also added a sweet potato which Bill doesn’t like but he didn’t realise because he was too busy saying he didn’t like aubergines! The plate was cleaned! Don’t tell him but I’ve got one more sweet potato which I’ll sneak into something. Also got some peppers and onions and more carrots left, they keep well. I had the last over ripe banana with my breakfast this morning. Fruit basket is now empty, onto the tins. Bill has 2 apples left in the fridge which he’s saving – not sure why but they are still ok. 2 bars of chocolate and a crunchie in tact. 🙂

All well on board. 🙂

The blog goes through to facebook but we can’t see facebook or your comments. I’ll catch up with them all in the Caribbean. If you wish to email us please use mdqf6 @ sailmail.com (take out the gaps) Stay safe everyone.

South Africa to the Caribbean – day 36

Our position at 10.00 (11.00 GMT) Saturday 25th February was 10 36S
018 42W
on a course of 296T with a 1 – 2 meter swell and sunny blue skies. Our 24 hour run from 10.00 yesterday to 10.00 today was 127 miles. We have 912 miles to go to Fernando de Noronha, less than a 1000 now.

The wind stayed with us for the morning but in the afternoon it gradually became lighter. By the evening our speed was down to 4.7kts and other cruisers on the evening net were also slowing down. We continued to sail and overnight the wind picked up again giving us a boat speed of 5.5kts but our average speed over 24 hours dropped to 5.2kts.

As we get nearer the equator it’s getting very hot and sticky. My skin feels clammy, which I don’t like, and I stick to the paper of charts and books. It going to take several weeks to get over the equator.

As there isn’t a lot to do at the moment Bill and I have started our book. The subject is a secret but hopefully one day it will be published.

I made my bread and banana loaf yesterday. The latter was delicious; the bread not so good. I had added too much water and although I added more flour it became very sticky making it difficult to knead. It didn’t rise so well but I still put it in the oven. Fortunately it baked ok and wasn’t too bad. A bit heavy but edible. The banana loaf is delicious with some apricot jam on it.

I cooked fish for dinner last night but don’t get excited we didn’t catch it, I bought it from the supermarket in St Helena. I dipped it in flour, egg, then breadcrumbs and shallow fried it. I also bought some frozen wedges, which I baked in the oven, and we had those with the fish and some carrots. I had the last grapefruit for my breakfast this morning. 😦

All well on board. 🙂

The blog goes through to facebook but we can’t see facebook or your comments. I’ll catch up with them all in the Caribbean. If you wish to email us please use mdqf6 @ sailmail.com (take out the gaps) Stay safe everyone.

South Africa to the Caribbean – day 35

Our position at 10.00 (11.00 GMT) Friday 24th February was
11 28S
016 51W
on a course of 296T with a 1 – 2 meter swell and 75% cloud cover Our 24 hour run from 10.00 yesterday to 10.00 today was 144 miles. We have 1036 miles to go to Fernando de Noronha.

BORED ….bored….bored bored bored. We’re not even half way to Fernando yet!

After my report yesterday the wind gradually died and the sails were flapping. Eventually at midday at a speed of 1.7kts Bill gave in and put the engine on (probably because his ears were aching!!) The batteries needed a bit of a charge because we had cloud cover which wasn’t letting the sun through to the solar panels. Fortunately the wind came back after an hour and a half and we were sailing again.

We made some good speeds in the afternoon and overnight regaining the ground we had lost.

There’s a lot of talk on the net about the ITCZ (inter tropical convergence zone) commonly called the Doldrums. It’s an area around the equator where the wind changes which brings thunder storms as well as light winds. At the moment we have south east trade winds south of the equator. North of the equator are north east trade winds and the bit in the middle is the ITCZ. Unfortunately it doesn’t stay in one place and the talk is about where it is at the moment. SAMMNET in SA is very helpful plus it’s possible to download a sailmail file called metarea5@sailmail.com We’ll look at it closer when we’re another 500 miles forward.

I made a nice taglitelli carbonara last night and I’m baking today – bread and banana loaf. Will report back tomorrow as to how they go.

All well on board. 🙂

The blog goes through to facebook but we can’t see facebook or your comments. I’ll catch up with them all in the Caribbean. If you wish to email us please use mdqf6 @ sailmail.com (take out the gaps) Stay safe everyone.

South Africa to the Caribbean – day 34

Our position at 10.00 (11.00 GMT) Thursday 23rd February was 12 28S
014 37W
on a course of 292T
Our 24 hour run from 10.00 yesterday to 10.00 today was 142 miles. We have 1176 miles to go to Fernando de Noronha.

Another good sailing day yesterday with speeds between 6 – 8kts sog in a steady F3 from the south east. It dropped off overnight and we were down to 5kts but that’s not a bad thing. Still doing an average of just under 6kts. No rain yesterday which is good because the rain clouds suck away our wind for an hour or so. The forecast is more of the same for the next couple of days then the wind will lighten and come more from the east. We have gradually made our way south of the rhumb line to be ready for that.

Bill fixed the generator yesterday but he says it needs its carburetor cleaned out and new filters. Will take it to a Honda dealer in the US. It ran for 5 or 6 hours yesterday and charged the batteries so that was good.

Everyone was happy on the net this morning and all merrily sailing along.

We passed our quarter of the way to Fernando yesterday at midday which I was pleased about.

All well on board. 🙂

The blog goes through to facebook but we can’t see facebook or your comments. I’ll catch up with them all in the Caribbean. If you wish to email us please use mdqf6 @ sailmail.com (take out the gaps) Stay safe everyone.

South Africa to the Caribbean – day 33

Our position at 10.00 (11.00 GMT) Wednesday 22nd February was 13 10S
012 22W
on a course of 292T
Our 24 hour run from 10.00 yesterday to 10.00 today was 141 miles. We have 1313 miles to go to Fernando de Noronha.

More of the same SE trade winds straight up our rear. This is a down wind ride. We are making an average of 6kts with the twin headsails out and have had a mixture of sun and clouds but no more rain. Camomile is thundering down the waves making over 7 1/2 kts at times. There was a bit less wind yesterday but it picked up again at midnight. It still a little chilly at night and I wear a fleece on night watch but the days are getting much warmer now as we head towards the equator.

The solar panels do a great job powering the batteries keeping the fridge and freezer and the instruments going, add the hydraulic auto pilot to the equation and the batteries start going down. The auto pilot is off at the moment with the Hydrovane steering us but with the cloud cover we have the solars aren’t quite doing the job so yesterday Bill had the portable generator on all day – until it stopped. Bill’s job today was take it apart and fix it. There’s a lot of swearing going on so not sure how it’s going.

Spoke to most of the boats this morning on the net. Antares are about 60 miles ahead of us and Solstice are about 40 miles behind us, Norsa is about a mile behind Solstice. Ganash are about 80 miles away but on a slightly different course to us as they are heading for Trinidad. Didn’t hear from Marieke this morning. We’ve also heard that WOW and Galatea have left St Helena. Keyif have made it to Trinidad and Adina have left Fernando. Tintin made it safely to Capetown and are waiting for a window to leave. Divanty are also leaving Cape Town soon. Good luck to everyone. x

The blog goes through to facebook but we can’t see facebook or your comments. I’ll catch up with them all in the Caribbean. If you wish to email us please use mdqf6 @ sailmail.com (take out the gaps) Stay safe everyone.

South Africa to the Caribbean day 32

Our position at 10.00 (11.00 GMT) Tuesday 21st February was 14 08S
010 14W
on a course of 292T
Our 24 hour run from 10.00 yesterday to 10.00 today was 142 miles. We have 1450 miles to go to Fernando de Noronha.

We’ve had quite a lot of squally showers over the last 24 hours. Fortunately they haven’t brought strong winds but instead suck the wind away. The wind is still coming from the south east and varies between 10 to 18kts. The twizzle is still rigged and is the best downwind option for us. Our speed was between 5 and 7kts for most of the day but overnight we slowed down in the squalls and this morning were only doing 3kts for a time and I was tempted to put the engine on but back up to 5.2kts now.

I did my net this morning, Antares are about 30 miles to the west of us, Ganash is about 70 miles to our north east, Marieke is about 30 miles behind us and Norsa and Solstice are about 40 miles behind. All is well with everyone. In the evening we have the G&T net which is the gossip and tales net. I usually have a ‘G&T’ disguised as a cup of tea!

So that’s it, quite boring really but rather that than storms. I made a chicken curry last night with some Thai green curry paste that was really strong.

The blog goes through to facebook but we can’t see facebook or your comments. I’ll catch up with them all in the Caribbean. If you wish to email us please use mdqf6 @ sailmail.com (take out the gaps) Stay safe everyone.

South Africa to the caribbean – day 31 off again

Our position at 10.00 (11.00 GMT) Monday 20th February was
14 57S
008 01W
Our 24 hour run from 10.00 yesterday to 10.00 today was 143 miles

I have to start this report with a correction from the last one, the buoy at St Helena was at 15 55S and 005 43 WEST not east.

So with grey skies and a heavy heart we left St Helena yesterday. What a wonderful place; a little piece of England in the south Atlantic. I’ll try and write my second report on the island on passage then post the photos when we get to the Caribbean. I posted the photos for the day 1 blog and some of the other blogs while in St Helena but the internet was slow and expensive there. We had all decided to stay and wait for the RMS St Helena to arrive with fresh supplies but our departure was brought forward with a severe swell warning issued on Saturday. To begin with 3 to 4 meters swells from the north west were being forecast starting 2pm on Monday but that was slightly reduced to 2 or 3 meter swells before we left but the islanders were full of tales of how bad it can get so we decided to check out and leave along with Antares, Norsa, Solstice and Marieke III. WOW and Galetea are following us later today.

We left buoy 25 at 09.00 and within 15 minutes the twin headsails on the twizzle rig were out and we were sailing. It was a cloudy day with showers and it took a while for the wind to get established but the day was mostly spent sailing between 5 and 6 kts rising to 7kts regularly. We are heading for the islands of Fernando de Naronha off the Brazilian coast which are 1734 miles away – AARRGGHH here we go again. It’s about the same distance as Cape Town to St Helena and will be half way between Cape Town and Florida where we need to catch our plane on 9th May – so no pressure.

So far it’s an easy sail with 15kts of SE wind and blue skies. We are on a heading of 293 degrees true. On the net this morning (10.00 GMT on 8110) all yachts were reporting fair winds and calm seas and the forecast is for the same for the next 6 or 7 days.

The only bit of excitement last night was just after I had gone to bed I heard a commotion in our little bathroom. I put on the light and a flying fish had managed to get passed the stanchions, the lifebuoy and through the little window and landed on the floor. I hate them and Bill came and threw it out of the window. My bathroom smelt fishy this morning.

Our dinner last night was left overs from the buffet the night before. I chopped up half an onion, a carrot, half a red and green pepper and fried them with some chopped up beef slices, some beef curry, an egg and some rice. stir it all together, sprinkle a bit of Parmesan on it (Bill likes Parmesan) and it was delicious. The only fresh stuff we could get in St Helena was carrots, onions, tomatoes, lettuce, cucumber, green peppers and bananas. No potatoes any where on the island because the ones in Cape Town reportedly had a worm in them that the islanders didn’t want to introduce to their crops. I’ve still got 4 green apples in the fridge that I bought when we first arrived. To the yachties following on behind us when you get to St Helena if you see any fruit or veg, buy it because it will be gone when you go back.

So life on board continues. Bill sorted out the computer thankfully and my little computer now has this email system downloaded on to it as a back up so hopefully we can stay in email contact with everyone. The blog goes through to facebook but we can’t see facebook or your comments. I’ll catch up with them all in the caribbean. Stay safe everyone.

South Africa to the Caribbean week 3 – Exploring St Helena

The beautiful cliffs on the approach to the mooring field.

The beautiful cliffs on the approach to the mooring field.

Discovered by the Portuguese in 1502 St Helena became a Dutch and then a British possession first under the East India company then the crown. Situated in the South Atlantic ocean it was a strategically important port of call during the British Empire until the opening of the Suez canal. It is now a British Overseas territory forming a dependency with Ascension island and Tristan da Cunha. The island’s remote location meant it was used as a place of exile for key prisoners including some 6000 Boers, Chief Dinizulu, Bahraini princes and of course Napoleon.

The cliffs behind us.

The cliffs behind us.

 

This is the view of the volcanic cliffs behind us.

A volcanic outcrop the island is a 47 sq mile and has sheer barren cliffs that are intersected with deep valleys, which slope steeply from the central ridges.

The main street in Jamestown

The main street in Jamestown

Jamestown, the capital of St Helena, was founded in 1659 when the English East India company built a fort and established a garrison at the site of James bay naming it after James II. The quintessential Georgian seaport consists of little more than a single street stretching for a mile inland nestling in a deep-sided volcanic valley. It retains a remarkable heritage with the likes of the Duke of Wellington, Captain Bligh, Charles Darwin, Captain Cook, as well as Napoleon, having walked its streets. Main Street has some of the best examples of Georgian architecture in the world. There are also a significant number of fortifications, remains, and historic buildings around the island.

One of the old quayside buildings

One of the old quayside buildings

The approach to the jetty

The approach to the jetty

Having arrived safely early on Thursday 2nd February we were keen to go ashore and explore. Once the customs had left us we packed up our bag to go ashore to see immigration. There is a very useful ferry service here to save you taking your dinghy ashore.   It’s only £2 return each. As we approached the jetty this is what we were faced with. There’s a lot of swell here and it would be impossible to land our own dinghy but the ferry boat is also quite difficult so to the yachties behind us be ready for this.

The little ferry boat

The little ferry boat

The customs building

The customs building

 

 

 

As you walk along the sea front you pass this beautifully restored customs building.

 

 

The entrance gates looking out

The entrance gates looking out

 

 

We continued towards the entrance to the town over the dry moat and through the arch doorway built in 1832.

 

The first building in front of you is the beautiful St James church the oldest Anglican church in the southern hemisphere dating from 1774. The steeple was added in 1843 but it looks very new so I think it’s recently been replaced again.

St James church

The little prison

The little prison

Next door is the prison, which apparently has some dozen or so prisoners. Then there’s the immigration centre where we had to produce our passports for our St Helena stamp and check in.

The entrance to Jacobs ladder

The entrance to Jacobs ladder

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We had a glimpse of Jacobs ladder through the alley in between the immigration centre and the little museum – but that’s for another day.

 

 

The castle gardens with Anne's place at the back

The castle gardens with Anne’s place at the back

Opposite the church are the castle gardens where you will find Anne’s place, a local eatery popular with the locals as well as yachties. It’s one of the three places where it’s possible to get onto the Internet although it isn’t free. £3.30 for half an hour is probably the most expensive Internet we’ve used on our travels and it’s the same price throughout the town. We decided to have burger and chips as it isn’t the sort of food we usually eat on passage.

The fire escape

The fire escape

 

The fire escape was very quirky; there was a ladder leading back into the gardens on the outside.

Friday we stayed on board sorting out the boat.   Bill had some small jobs to do and I wanted to clean through after all the rolling around on passage. We had a heavy shower of rain, which washed all the salt off and saved me washing it.

Looking out to the anchorage in the evening

Looking out to the anchorage in the evening

 

 

 

Saturday we went ashore on the 4pm ferry to have a delicious pig roast at Anne’s place, which at £12 a head with all you can eat plus a doggy bag to take home was good value. It’s only once a month but to our friends behind us this is a great evening. We booked a late ferryboat at 8pm to take us back to the boat.

A good view of the town from Jacobs ladder

A good view of the town from Jacobs ladder

 

 

Sunday morning we decided to go to church, as it was the first C of E church we had seen in a long while. The vicar and the parishioners welcomed us. We had coffee afterwards while looking up at Jacobs ladder. As we didn’t have anything to rush back for we thought we’d attempt it in our Sunday best.

Wonderful view of St James church

Wonderful view of St James church

 

 

 

We didn’t race up and did 50 steps then stopped to look at the view, another 50 steps and took a photo, another 50 steps and had a drink and so on until we made it to the top.

Bill half way up

Bill half way up

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I'm not very good at taking selfies

I’m not very good at taking selfies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We made it to the top

We made it to the top

Panoramic shot from the top

Panoramic shot from the top

The view was magnificent. We had a good view of the supply ship RMS St Helena that had arrived with passengers, containers and supplies.

Remains of the old fort

Remains of the old fort

At the top were the remains of a Napoleonic fort built in 1873.

The old barracks were now derelict but some of the out buildings were being used by the local fire brigade to store their vehicles.

Fire brigade vehicles.

Fire brigade vehicles.

Old gun enplacements

Old gun enplacements

 

 

 

We walked further along and noticed some gun inplacements that were from either WW I or II.

Camomile on her buoy

Camomile on her buoy

The bottom of the cliffs below

The bottom of the cliffs below

 

Looking out over the edge gave us a superb view of Camomile in the mooring field. The rocks below us at the bottom of the cliffs didn’t look very friendly. There aren’t any beaches around St Helena.

The beautiful Georgian Main street

The beautiful Georgian Main street

 

 

We walked back to the look out by the steps and the town below looked like a model village but from that height it was possible to see the main street in all its Georgian glory.

The view down from the top

The view down from the top

 

 

 

Coming back down was harder than walking up because of the pounding your knees get. I was lowering myself down as carefully as I could.

 

 

Half way down

Half way down

I made it!

I made it!

 

It was a relief to get to the bottom of the 699 steps.

We walked back along the quay to the water ferry.   The whole area was a hive of activity with the unloading of the RMS St Helena taking place. Everything but everything on the island arrives on the ship including vehicles. The RMS has her own cranes and can lift her cargo onto a flotilla of flat bed barges, which may their way back and forth to the quay where a local crane is used to unload them.

Ready to lift

Ready to lift

We watched as a lorry was being unloaded. These set of photos make it look easy but there’s always a metre or two of swell running and the timing is critical.

 

 

Up it goes

Up it goes

Lowering the lorry onto the quay

Lowering the lorry onto the quay

As the barge dips down with the swell the crane started taking up the slack then as the barge came up the crane lifted the vehicle clear of the barge and kept going up over the sea wall and onto the quay. Very clever.

First sight of the whale sharks

First sight of the whale sharks

 

 

 

The highlight of our week was swimming with Whale sharks. We had arranged for Johnny who runs the ferry service to take us out on his big boat. We went with Martin and Elizabeth on Caduceus and a guide and that was it – so lucky. The ferry boat came alongside Camomile picked us up and transferred us to the bigger boat waiting just offshore for us and off we went. Within an hour the call went up there were whale sharks ahead. Two of them were basking on the surface. We had gone in our wetsuits all ready to get in the water.

So close

So close

As soon as we were alongside them we jumped in. The first thing that strikes you is their size, they are enormous at about 12 meters long – bigger than Camomile! Bill and I saw a third whale shark on its own so swam over to get a closer look.

Bill was so close

Bill was so close

I got an amazing video of Bill swimming underneath it but unfortunately I can’t upload in St Helena maybe in the Caribbean. We watched it for a while then it twisted and dived out of sight. We swam back to the boat to find a forth whale shark swimming nearby at an even bigger 14 metres. Karl the guide got a wonderful clear shot of Bill swimming above it. After about three quarters of an hour we got back on the boat, exhausted with amazement at what we had just seen, totally awesome!

Karl's photo of Bill

Karl’s photo of Bill

Amazing landscape

Amazing landscape

Johnny drove back along the coastline for us to get a good view of the construction of the island. It was possible to see the layers and layers of volcanic activity that took millions of years to form.

An old Napoleonic fort

An old Napoleonic fort

There were different colours in some areas.   There are also parts of a Napoleonic fort built into the cliffs and we could see a walkway had been carved out of the hill to take the soldiers back to Jamestown all those years ago.

An amazing day.

An amazing day.

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