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We made it to Terengganu.

Starbucks in the Puteri mall with the water sculpture in front of it

Starbucks in the Puteri mall with the water sculpture in front of it

We stayed in Puteri Harbour marina for 2 weeks.  Bill and I went to the dentist. We both had xrays. I had a 2 fillings, one big one small, and Bill had a much bigger job culminating in a crown being fitted after 10 days.  All for the princely sum of MYR1190 (£205), bargain.  The torn sail was taken off, measured, photographed and folded up, while the spare one was hoisted.  It’s not as good quality but will do for the next few months while we get a new one ordered.  Shopping was brought in, markets explored, jobs completed from the jobs list (it never seems to go down), washing of us, the boat and clothes.  Most days being fueled by my favourite cappuccinos from Starbucks and the odd meal at one of the many restaurants at Puteri.

 

 

Exploring Singapore

Exploring Singapore

 

Monday 29th June we took the bus over the 2nd link bridge to Singapore for a few days; a mini break. We had lunch at raffles marina while checking out their Chandler store in the afternoon.  Had a wonderful walk around the old colonial area although it’s been dwarfed by the huge skyscrapers everywhere.

 

 

Panoramic view of Singapore

Panoramic view of Singapore

 

A nice meal down by the harbour

A nice meal down by the harbour

 

 

 

Enjoyed a delicious meal down by the old boat quay with a view of the amazing Marina Bay Sands hotel before heading off on the MRT to the night zoo.  Good evening but not sure it’s as good as it’s rated.

 

A new gadget

A new gadget

 

The next morning after coffee in Chinatown it was back to Bugis and Simlin tower, Bill’s favourite place, to buy a new gadget for the boat.  It’s a media player and new hard drive so we can play all the films and TV series people have given us on various formats stored on different computers, hard drives and old fashioned DVDs. Now they can all be kept in one place and played on our new TV.

 

 

Cargo ship carrying turbine blades

Cargo ship carrying turbine blades

 

We went back to the boat for another round of shopping, sewing and preparing for our summer on the East coast of Malaysia before finally leaving at 06.30 on 5th July with Inspiration Lady following. First we had to sail or motor around Singapore on the edge of one of the busiest shipping lanes in the world.  There were many cargo ships carrying containers but this one was loaded with blades for wind turbines.  From the writing on the bow we assumed it had come from China but no idea where it was heading.

 

An enormous oil drilling platform

An enormous oil drilling platform

Having left Puteri 2 hours BEFORE low water and taking the last of the ebb down the Johor Straits, the tide turned in our favour at the entrance and was with us all the way around Singapore as we headed east back into Malaysian waters on the other side of Singapore. The sails were out, the engine was off and the tide was still with us so we were reluctant to stop and carried on passed this huge drilling platform onto to the far eastern corner of Malaysia.  As we started heading up the east coast the wind turned into an easterly bringing with it a nasty swell.  As it was getting dark both yachts stopped in the first bay but it was obvious we wouldn’t be able to stay.  Poor Camomile and Inspiration Lady were pitching and rolling badly.  The plan was to stop and try and rest for a few hours before continuing otherwise we would arrive at the first island in the dark.  This meant poor Bill was doing a night sail for his birthday but he said he didn’t mind. Having left at midnight the anchor went down on the northern coast of Pulau Sibu at 10.00.

Caroline, Bill, Bill, Jackie and Gary

Caroline, Bill, Bill, Jackie and Gary

Anchored at

02˚14.0N

104˚03.5 E

Bill’s birthday celebrations could begin.  The first thing I did was jump in the water, my first swim in the sea this summer.  Hard to believe I know but the west coast is quite murky and I don’t swim unless I can see the bottom.  Later Gary and Jackie of Inspiration Lady and Bill and Caroline of Juffa joined us in the evening for a pot luck supper and a game of cards. A great evening was enjoyed by all.

 

Camomile at anchor

Camomile at anchor

Wednesday 8th July we continued north past the point we had reached last year with my sister Angela on board and onto the north coast of Pulau Sri Buat anchoring at

02˚41.86N

103˚53.89E

An absolutely idyllic spot.  We jumped in the dinghy and headed to the beach but I couldn’t resist photographing a beautiful shiny Camomile on the way.

 

An uninhabited beach

An uninhabited beach

 

 

The island was uninhabited so we had this wonderful beach to ourselves. It was great to relax in the warm waters after all the hard work that’s been necessary to get Camomile looking as beautiful as she does during the first half of the year. It felt like summer had started.

 

 

Storm clouds approaching

Storm clouds approaching

The beach before the rain

The beach before the rain

 

 

 

But in true British summer fashion we suddenly noticed storm clouds approaching and just got back to the boat before the rain started and this stunning view ….

 

 

The rain lashed down

The rain lashed down

 

 

….. turned into this as the rain lashed down.  That was the end of summer for the day.

 

 

 

Snorkeling in the beautiful water

Snorkeling in the beautiful water

 

The following day the sun was out and we explored the bay in the dinghy. There was another lovely beach behind the big rock and I enjoyed an interesting snorkel there.  You can just see Camomile peaking around the edge of the rock on the left of the picture.  There was some lovely coral further out.

 

 

Me, Jackie, Janice, Mick, Bill and Gary

Me, Jackie, Janice, Mick, Bill and Gary

Left the beautiful anchorage on Friday 10th to motor the 15 miles to Tioman island.  Fortunately there were 2 spaces in the marina so Camomile and Inspiration Lady went in.  Juffa was already there.  Jackie and I hit ‘the shops’ in the afternoon while Bill tried to organise some power so we could have the air conditioning on for a few days.  Tioman is a quaint island and like stepping back in time but Jackie and I managed to find a few supplies to booster our larder.  It’s also duty free which meant cheap wine – yessss.  Mick and Janice anchored Zoa off one evening and we joined them and Inspiration Lady for a meal ashore.

Another evening we joined Bill and Caroline on Juffa for drinks and during our conversation discovered they were both teachers from Durrington High school, had 2 boys the same age as ours and lived in the next village to us in Angmering while we were there.  What a small world we live in!

The chartplotter looked like space invaders

The chartplotter looked like space invaders

Tuesday 14th Camomile and Juffa left Inspiration Lady in Tioman marina. Juffa headed south as they had to go back to Johor but we continued north on our own.  Our plan for the summer was head north quickly and then come back slowly. Finally we had good winds and sailed all the way to Pekan passing these anchored boats on our way, and anchored just after 6pm behind the breakwater at

03˚32.1N

103˚28.1E

It was ok for overnight but quite rolly.  The next day we left at 8am, the sails were out straight away and we sailed all the way to the Chukai river.

Inside the Cukai river

Inside the Cukai river

The wind had gone round to the south east which was great for sailing but not for entering the river.  By the time we reached the bar at the entrance there was a dangerous swell of a metre running.  Bill skilfully helmed Camomile through the entrance with 1.5metres under our keel for a minute or two.  I sat very quietly watching – doesn’t happen very often – with my heart in my mouth but once inside the swell dropped and the depth gauge increased.  Reminded us of the bars across the Australian harbour entrances.  Once inside we continued up the river for about a mile and anchored opposite the town.

The next day was the last day of Ramadan and the following day was Hari Raya, a major Muslim holiday.  It felt like Christmas eve in the town and the market was very busy with people stocking up for the festivities.  As we walked around I saw some live chickens having their throats cut and handed to eager buyers, and a dead cow being unloaded from the back of a truck complete with blood, guts and all – we didn’t stay long and I don’t have any photos of it.  Fortunately we managed to find a regular supermarket further in the town.  In the evening there were lots of people celebrating with fireworks going off most of the night.

Motoring back out of the river

Motoring back out of the river

The next morning Friday 17th all was quiet as we chugged back down the river through a much calmer entrance.  There was no wind so we motored all the way to Tenggol.  What was really strange was there wasn’t one single fishing boat out, we have never seen that before.

Pulau Tenggol was another 40 miles further north with a deep anchorage of 30 metres! Far too deep for us plus the sea bed was reported to be broken coral and wrecks, deadly for an anchor. Fortunately the local dive shop has tied three buoys to some purposely sunken wrecks quite close to the beach but not too close to the reef.  So we picked one up at

04˚48.44N (getting further north)

103˚40.57E

There was another British boat there called Sa Vahn with Fiona and Clare on board with their own dive kit who had dived on the wrecks to check out the lines and all seemed good. The beach looked very inviting so we swam in for a walk.  Unknown to us was the fact that the beach is full of sand flies and I came back with my legs covered in bites, they were as bad as the ones we got on South Island in NZ.

Wonderful white sand

Wonderful white sand

 

 

Sunday 19th left Tenggol at 9am and sailed all the way to Pulau Kappas dropping the anchor at 4pm at

05˚13.5N

103˚15.6E in 6 metre on sand.

For all you guys following us Kappas is beautiful; a true paradise island. Teal blue sea, verdant green backdrop, white sand and wonderful coral.

There are a series of beaches on the west side linked by stairways so you can walk between them (either my camera or computer ate the photos I took!) Great for lunch trips with a bit of exercise on the way back to walk off chocolate monkey pancakes which are pancakes with caramelised bananas covered in chocolate sauce – nommm nommm!

Amazing rock formations

Amazing rock formations

Approaching the cave

Approaching the cave

 

 

 

 

The island is quite small so we were able to take the dinghy around it. The rock formations are magnificent.

100s of bats on the ceiling

100s of bats on the ceiling

 

 

 

 

On the east side I spotted a cave and on closer examination from the entrance discovered it was full of bats. Not sure if you can see from this photo but the top of the cave was covered in them; very noisy and very smelly.

Amazing coral

Amazing coral

 

We stayed there until Friday 24th July relaxing, reading, a little writing and snorkelling every day.  Such a delightful anchorage. It would have been nice to stay longer but we needed to get to Terengganu to check out the marina to make sure it’s suitable to leave Camomile there later in the summer. So I’ll just post some of the many snorkeling photos I took at Kapas for you to enjoy.

 

 

Stunning green coral

Stunning green coral

 

Many colourful clams

Many colourful clams

 

 

 

 

 

 

I love the shapes in this hard coral

I love the shapes in this hard coral

 

and many fish

and many fish

 

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Angela’s Holiday and Sue’s Birthday

Ice cream sundaes, yum yum.

Ice cream sundaes, yum yum.

As I sit here writing this blog my sister Angela is winging her way back to the UK. By the time I’ve posted the blog I’m sure she will have forgotten her holiday but we did have a great time. Angela arrived Sunday 27th April – 3 days after the lightening strike. Bill had spent hours trying to get enough of the boat systems working so we would be able to limp out of the marina to see a bit of the area. We spent the first couple of days in Danga bay marina in Malaysia. Although it’s easy for us to pop back and forwards to Singapore, (but you get a total of 4 stamps in your passport each time!) it’s difficult and costly to get the boat in and out so the boat remained in Malaysia. On Monday Angela and I hit the malls and she was soon leading me astray.

Walking around the fruit farm

Walking around the fruit farm

The rally had organised a tour of the Johor area on Tuesday so we decided to join it.  The coach left at 7am and took a nice drive through the countryside to a tropical fruit farm where they showed us many different varieties of fruit, some of which I hadn’t even heard of.

 

 

The fruit was wrapped in pink plastic bags for protection

The fruit was wrapped in pink plastic bags for protection

After a short presentation on how their honey is produced in a very welcome cool air-conditioned room we were shown to the restaurant where the staff had prepared a smorgasbord of fruit platters for us to try. Our favourite was dragon fruit, which I’d often seen in the supermarket, now I’ll be more willing to buy some. We also tried deep fried breadfruit, which looked like parsnips but tasted like chips before moving onto a local village for lunch. On arrival the villagers provided us with a display of martial arts accompanied by some loud banging of drums. The ladies had prepared some beautiful food so, after visiting the handicraft stalls we got back in the coach with very full stomachs! With palm trees stretching as far as one could see our next stop was a visit to a factory where huge bundles of palm nuts are turned into oil. As we got out of the coach the smell was awful, Angela and I had a quick look at what they were doing then retreated to the coach. We continued on to the ruins of a 16th century fort and though little remained, there was a nice museum and amazing views of Singapore from the raised area the fort was built on.

Crocodile farm

Crocodile farm

Our last stop was a crocodile farm where we watched the owner call and feed dozens of crocs. Ang and I thought there were too many to each pen climbing over each other to get to the smelly chicken that was being thrown their way. A walkway had been constructed over the pens so you could look down on the reptiles though we lost count of how many there were however 500 wouldn’t have been an over estimate… they really didn’t have very much room. All in all it was a long day but a good first outing. I would have liked to show more photos but my new camera has eaten them and won’t give them back, the outing photos are from Jacqui on Jackster.

Wednesday we stayed on the boat so Angela could start her sun bathing and all packed our bags ready for Singapore. Thursday 1st May saw us starting our journey from Johor Bahru (JB) to cross the border to Singapore. As I said the boat was in Malaysia and since Singapore gained its independence in 1965 it’s now a separate country with borders and bureaucracy to cross. The trip started with a bus from the marina to JB Sentral where you walk through C.I.Q. to the Malaysian border control, much like airport departure gates. As we were walking through the elevated glass sided halls the taxis were visible as they queued underneath us to get through passport control. We’ve done the journey in a taxi and a bus and I think the bus is quicker, even though there’s a lot of walking. After we had been stamped out of Malaysia we went down the escalator into no mans land and the buses. For the princely sum of MYR1.30 (about 25p) you get on a bus and cross the causeway bridge. The buses are always packed to the gunnels and the last one in is given a push so the driver can shut the door. Fortunately although there’s a 50kph speed limit you’re lucky if the traffic moves at 10kph so it’s quite safe. On the Singapore side you have to go up the escalator, over the top of the taxis again, have your passport stamped and down the escalator on the other side into Singapore and back onto the bus, although not necessarily the same one, and your MYR1.30 carries you to the first Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) station where you can get to most parts of Singapore on this over/underground metro system. The whole process can take several hours. We took the MRT to Lavender and walked to our hotel.

The beautiful buildings of Little India

The beautiful buildings of Little India

The Arton was clean and modern but the rooms were tiny, they had everything you needed though and the beds were comfy. The hotel was on the edge of Little India so having dropped our bags we took a little walk. I thought for once we weren’t going to do any thing to do with boats – WRONG.

 

Bill window shopping

Bill window shopping

 

 

 

Little India is also next to Sim Lim towers where they have lots of electronic shops but as it was the 1st May bank holiday in Singapore most of the shops were closed. Bill just had to make do with a bit of window-shopping. The deal was for every 5 minutes in Sim Lim towers Ang and I could have half an hour in the proper shops so 30 minutes of wandering gave us 3 hours in Orchard road.

The famous Orchard Road

The famous Orchard Road

 

 

 

The whole road consists of mall after mall. We found a good one and started shopping; shoes were bought!

 

 

 

We went shopping

We went shopping

The top floor was a huge food court so we had dinner there before heading back to the hotel.

Chocolate waffles for breakfast

Chocolate waffles for breakfast

 

The next morning was my birthday and we started it off wantonly with chocolate waffles in a local food market. As time was limited we had decided the best way to see the city was a morning coach tour. The guide was very informative giving us lots of interesting explanations as we were driving along.

 

First stop Merlion Park

First stop Merlion Park

The first stop was the famous Merlion park where the symbol of Singapore stood. The statue has the head of a lion, a fish like body, stands 8.6 metres high, weighs in at 70 tonnes and is one of Singapore’s most well known icons. The Merlion is representative of Singapore’s humble beginnings as a fishing village.

The impressive Merlion statue

The impressive Merlion statue

 

 

It’s set against the backdrop of sky scrappers in Singapore’s CBD.

 

 

 

 

We were dwarfed by the statue

We were dwarfed by the statue

10

 

Overlooking the park were the triple towers of the Marina Bay Sands hotel where room prices start at S$340 (£170) a night and that doesn’t include breakfast.

 

 

The Thian Hock Keng temple

The Thian Hock Keng temple

 

 

We got back in the coach and continued on our drive through China town to the Thian Hock Keng temple. Singapore’s oldest and most important Hokkien temple was a haven of tranquillity. Built between 1839 and 1842 it was once the favourite landing point of Chinese sailors before reclamation pushed the sea almost a kilometre down the road. Upon completion of the temple southbound immigrants who had just landed or northbound immigrants heading back to China would always stop by the temple facing the waterfront to pray for calm waves and a safe journey; It stuck a chord some how.

The beautiful carved ceiling

The beautiful carved ceiling

 

 

The carvings in the ceiling were amazing. Angela and I were given some josh sticks to say a prayer with and light, which we did for Mum.

 

 

 

Thian Hock Keng temple

Thian Hock Keng temple

 

The chocolate shop

The chocolate shop

 

 

Our next stop was a chocolate shop (who picked this tour?) where the assistants were waiting to hand out samples to encourage us to buy their wares; we didn’t disappoint them. Pride of place in the window was a chocolate lion; lucky he didn’t lose that paw.

 

Chocolate lion - shall I kiss your paw?

Chocolate lion – shall I kiss your paw?

 

View across the city

View across the city

We drove around more of the city before heading up to the viewpoint on Mount Faber. Although it’s only 105 metres high it’s one of the highest points in Singapore giving a fabulous 360º panoramic view. In 1857 it was decided to build a fort for fear of revolt among the local Indian sepoys. Defence work was carried out and granite gun emplacements were completed halfway up the hill but Mount Faber never became a fort and instead an observatory was built there in 1905.

Another Merlion

Another Merlion

 

 

 

To the south the famous Sentosa island could be seen with it’s designer apartments but to the north was just mile after mile of the high risers of inner city living all under the watchful gaze of another Merlion statue.

 

 

 

 

Raffles hotel

Raffles hotel

Table next to the harp

Table next to the harp

We were taken back to our hotel in time to change and get back on the MRT in time for tea at the Tiffin tearooms in the famous Raffles Hotel, for my birthday treat. As it was my birthday they gave us a very nice table right next to the harp.

 

 

 

Just for starters

Just for starters

 

 

There was a 3 tiered cake tray already on the table with 3 of each sandwich on the bottom tier and 3 of each cake on the top two tiers. The waiter directed us to a buffet table, which had some hot items, as well as more cakes, and a table with a selection of fruit. After finishing the first lot of sandwiches they brought more. As we hadn’t eaten lunch we made a big dent in their buffet.

The hot buffet

The hot buffet

The fruit platters

The fruit platters

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Birthday lunch

Birthday lunch

Followed by Birthday cake

Followed by Birthday cake

 

All the time the harpist was playing beautiful music before striking up with Happy Birthday when the staff brought out a surprise cake with a candle and Happy Birthday Sue on it. I was over whelmed and speechless (not a natural condition for me(Bill added that bit)) but I soon recovered and blew my candle out.

Beautiful cake

Beautiful cake

Yummy

Yummy

 

It was a delicious chocolate cake although we couldn’t work out what the filling was but it tasted divine.  I was going to save the chocolate name for the boys who both love white chocolate but I appear to have mislaid it – sorry boys!

I even had my 4 cards to open at the table (courtesy of Ang who had brought them with her).

 

 

My birthday cards

My birthday cards

A very grand hallway

A very grand hallway

 

 

Angela and I decided to explore the hotel a bit although a lot of areas are for residents only. This was the amazing hallway. Then we found the bathroom and took a selfie through the mirror, it was beautifully decorated.

 

Our selfie in the bathroom

Our selfie in the bathroom

Singapore slings

Singapore slings

 

After we had eaten all the sandwiches, pastries, fruit and cakes we could manage and drank numerous cups of tea we rounded off the afternoon by adjourning to the iconic Long Bar for – What else? A genuine Singapore sling (although Angela and I choose a tropical cocktail version because they sounded nicer).

Suntec city with the fountain of wealth

Suntec city with the fountain of wealth

One of the places we had driven past in the morning was Suntec City where it’s said ‘you can buy everything under the sun’. As it was just around the corner we made our way there. It consists of 5 buildings the proportion of 4 fingers against ‘the thumb’ which was behind me. In the centre of this open “palm” lies the Fountain of Wealth which has featured in the Guiness Book of Records as the world’s largest fountain. It is said if you walk around the fountain 3 times you will come into money so of course we just had to do that.

Buildings 1, 2, 3 and 4

Buildings 1, 2, 3 and 4

The fountain of wealth

The fountain of wealth

The fountain was quite beautiful; the water jets were rotating in an interesting and continually varying pattern as we walked around them.

 

Restored shop houses of Chinatown

Restored shop houses of Chinatown

 

We continued to the night market in Chinatown where stepping out of the MRT we immediately entered an area that was more about the vibe than the shops. Restored shophouses looked down on a mixture of retro stalls selling mostly cheap tat.

 

Bill with Captain Haddock

Bill with Captain Haddock

One shop that caught Bill’s eye was the TinTin shop so, having been a fan as a young boy, he wanted his photo taken with Captain Haddock before admiring the stacks of TinTin memorabilia. Along a bit there were lots of delicious looking street food stalls but sadly, still stuffed from our tea, we didn’t get to try anything.

Waving cats

Waving cats

It was an easy several hours spent looking around and enjoying the atmosphere before it was time to be making our way back to MRT station but, on our way back I spotted these. If you’ve ever wondered where to buy those awful cat ornaments with the waving arms, well here they are. S$10 is about £5. If I’d paid £5 for 3 I think I’d have been robbed! The next morning I allowed Bill the time to go back to look at Sim Lim towers while Angela and I went back to Orchard road for more shopping. More shoes were bought but not by me this time then that afternoon we headed back to the causeway bridge to repeat the customs journey back into Malaysia.

Sun setting over the shipping

Sun setting over the shipping

Sunday 4th May we started Camomile’s engine and slowly motored down the Johor straits to the sea. Bill anchored the boat at the entrance ready for our early morning start the next day motoring around the south of Singapore island. Angela coped well with her first night at anchor and also without the air-conditioning unit, which can only run when we have power in a marina. We had sundowners watching the many ships passing through the Singapore straits against the sun set.

Lots of big cargo vessels

Lots of big cargo vessels

 

The sun was just coming up when we weighed anchor the next morning giving us a beautiful sunrise to watch. There were many ships of all sizes anchored and this local fishing boat was busy taking photos of us taking photos of them.

 

 

Local fishing boat

Local fishing boat

Tug and tow

Tug and tow

Tug and tows are the bane of our lives in these waters,they don’t have AIS and they rarely display the correct lights at night. It can be quite unnerving coming across one in the dark as they chug along with barges the size of a small island following.

 

 

Singapore from the sea

Singapore from the sea

 

 

It was interesting to see the CBD from the deck of the boat although we couldn’t get very close and Singapore is patrolled by many small police boats which are constantly watching for any one entering Singapore waters illegally. They are quite obsessive about it.

 

 

 

 

Marina Bay Sands hotel from the sea

Marina Bay Sands hotel from the sea

It took all day to motor the length of the island before clearing Singapore waters and anchoring off the Malaysian peninsular on the eastern side. Tuesday 6th was another early start because we had to motor all the way to the first island to make sure we had a calm anchorage. Since Mum died last year Angela has had a difficult time and I’ve been nagging her to come and stay with us so I could show her some deserted islands and catch a glimpse of the life we lead. After the lightening strike I didn’t think we were going to get there but we had made it. Fortunately the one instrument left partially working was the depth gauge, without it we wouldn’t have been able to leave the marina so someone up there was helping us. The sails came out for some of the journey and we had a good tide most of the day but the engine stayed on. Bill had rigged up the emergency tiller pilot to the Hydrovane so he didn’t have to hand steer all the way as the autopilot was another victim of the lightning. We used my new Samsung tab for Navigation, not ideal but better than nothing. So we limped along to Pulau Sibu, our first deserted island, although it had a village on it and a big resort around the corner. The next morning we went ashore and had a drink in a little café looking over the beach before walking through the village. There were palm trees everywhere and cows roaming freely. The little houses looked very well kept but the heat of the sun was very strong. The three of us walked back along the beach but it was really hot so we retreated back to the boat. (Sorry no pictures we left our camera behind!) In the afternoon Bill moved the boat to the next island and anchored on the south side of the island. It was such a good decision because that night a storm blew up. Although the wind instruments weren’t working Bill felt we had 50kts winds blowing over us and put more and more anchor chain out, hoping the anchor would hold. Luckily Angela didn’t seem worried about it and was busy watching the lightening. With winds coming from the north we were well protected. The storm lasted for several hours before the winds subsided and the sea returned to normal. By the morning everything had returned to normal. We learnt a few days later that it had caused quite a bit of damage and was only the 5th bad storm they had had like that in the last eight years, lucky us!

A proper deserted island

A proper deserted island

 

Thursday 8th May we finally found a little deserted island. With the dinghy loaded with deckchairs, etc we took the dinghy over to it and were the first footsteps in the sand.

 

 

 

Our little dinghy took us to the island

Our little dinghy took us to the island

Angela on a shell hunt

Angela on a shell hunt

 

Angela started a shell hunt of which we found several nice ones. It was lovely and peaceful. As we were walking along the beach a beautiful butterfly fluttered past; was Mum watching us playing?

I put my snorkel and fins on to discover a wonderful world just a short distance off the beach. Not so many fish but lots of coral, Angela decided she didn’t want to have a go, chicken!

Angela and I laying in the warm water

Angela and I laying in the warm water

 

 

The water was beautifully warm and we just laid in it with the waves lapping over us. Paradise.  In the distance we could see One Tree island, that is it’s name on the chart and sure enough it had one tree on it.

 

One tree island in the distance

One tree island in the distance

Another beautiful beach

Another beautiful beach

 

As the tide was out we clambered over the rocks at the end of the beach to find another beautiful beach round the corner, again, deserted. I love the silence of these places, just the birds calling and the lapping of the waves, stunning. On our way back to the boat Bill motored very slowly over the coral so Ang could look down onto it from the safety of the dinghy. Continuing on later that day to Pulau Besar which had a really nice yachtie friendly resort. The restaurant was available to non-residents so we ate out that evening. The owner had just bought a catamaran and wanting to make a good impression on the yatching fraternity offered us a drink on the house. That’s the way to do it! Free is cruiser price.

Angela and I went to the loo later in the evening, I wouldn’t normally mention this but the bathrooms were the most ornate I had ever seen. All marble with gold patterns, simply amazing.

The view from the restaurant was superb looking out across the boats. Two other rally boats turned up the next day. Ang decided she wanted to spend the afternoon sunbathing on the beach. As I was battling with a nasty cold I decided not to join her. When she returned she realised why we don’t sit on the beaches here because she was covered in sand fly bites all up the backs of her legs, hundreds of them.

That evening when we went ashore for dinner again and made sure we were sprayed for mossies too. As we were at the bar with the other four that evening we all got another round of drinks on the house. This is why we get ‘stuck’ in places like this. Photos courtsey of Janice on Zoa

The original plan for Angela’s holiday was to spend a week in the islands and then put her on a bus back to Singapore on Tuesday 13th but with the boat in the state it was we needed to get back to the JB area to get it sorted. So Saturday 10th we motored over to Mersing on the main land to pick up some supplies before motoring back to Pulau Sibu, the first island for an overnight stop before a very early start the next day for the 2 day motor back to Puteri harbour.

Another beautiful sunset

Another beautiful sunset

Sunday 11th was Angela’s last night at anchor and we all watched a beautiful sunset. On the Monday we arrived back at Puteri harbour and put the air conditioning back on. Angela had one more day so we spent it shopping, of course.

 

 

The fish stall in the night market - what cigarette?

The fish stall in the night market – what cigarette?

Angela doesn't look very impressed

Angela doesn’t look very impressed

In the evening we joined a group of people from the marina and went to the night market in the next village. I like shopping in these markets but I think Angela was horrifed, she’s used the pristine shelves of the English supermarkets.

 

 

 

4am Wednesday 14th May saw us all getting into a taxi for the trip back across the causeway, to Singapore airport, to home for Angela. Tears were shed but I think she had a nice time and nice rest. Byebye Ang see you soon. x

Byebye Angela

Byebye Angela

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