Week 15 – Beautiful teak cockpit

18Saturday 9th May we took one of Mr Din’s cars into town to get one more pot of prima and some rollers so Bill could paint the dinghy. We had coffee in Starbucks followed by our weekly shop then back to the boat for Bill to continue his work in the cockpit. Bill loves working with wood and has always wanted to get rid of the awful treadmaster that surrounds the cockpit and replace it with teak; now his dream was coming true. All the wood had already been prepared while we were on the hard, it just had to be glued in place now. This is the bridgehead before he started. The blue tape is covering various holes for winches, clutches and cleats and we don’t want the glue squeezing through them. The ‘glue’ is adhesive specially formulated for teak made by sikaflex.

The first pieces screwed into place.

The first pieces screwed into place.

Bill glued and screwed the first piece in place followed by all the pieces around the edge, which were also screwed in place to stop the planking from moving around.

 

Applying the adhesive

Applying the adhesive

 

Slotting the planking in

Slotting the planking in

 

 

Then it was just a matter of applying the adhesive and slotting the planking into place – just like that!

 

Weights holding planking in place

Weights holding planking in place

 

 

I had been through the boat and got all the spare anodes, diving weights, bags of anchor chain and anything heavy I could find for Bill to place on top of the teak to hold it flat. The glue went off fairly quickly so they didn’t need to be on there long.

The port side before it was started

The port side before it was started

 

 

The same method was applied to the port side of the cockpit coaming. First it was masked to stop the adhesive spoiling the new paintwork and the holes covered.

Applying the adhesive

Applying the adhesive

More weights

More weights

 

 

The adhesive was laid on and the end pieces screwed into place followed by all the planking and more weights.  The starboard side planking was also screwed, glued and laid. Still waiting for our parcel from UPS.

Bridgehead and both side of cockpit covered

Bridgehead and both side of cockpit covered

Painting the dighy with primer

Painting the dinghy with primer

 

Sunday 10th while I went for my early morning run Bill gave the dinghy transom a coat of primer before it got to hot.   The locker top in the bow is also being painted. The paint had pealed off so Bill decided to give it a paint job like the rest of the boat.  This was why we had tied up stern to.

Good use for the mystery objects

Good use for the mystery objects

The woodwork was resumed. Here is a close up of the position of the mystery objects now long hidden behind layers of paint. Bill wants to put in a curved seat behind the wheel. The wooden edges of the seat have to be ‘bent’ into position by cutting little slots out from underneath to be able to form the curved edging and screwed into place. The front edge is the same but the slots aren’t visible. Bill had quite a bit of trouble getting the wood to do what he wanted but eventually he succeeded.

Working on the seat

Working on the seat

 

 

The area was covered in adhesive and the seat planking slotted into place with more weights to weigh it down.   It’s very impressive.

 

Our new seat

Our new seat

 

Caulking the bridgehead

Caulking the bridgehead

 

 

Bill spent the rest of the day applying another two coats of primer to the dinghy and applying Sikaflex caulking to the bridgehead.   I spent the day writing and posting a blog.   Still nothing from UPS.

Undercoating the dinghy

Undercoating the dinghy

 

 

Monday 11th Bill got an undercoat on the dinghy transom and bow before it got too hot again.

 

 

Caulking the coaming

Caulking the coaming

 

 

Then he continued applying the black caulking to the coaming and the seat. It’s going to look superb.

 

 

Looking good

Looking good

Re-caulking the old seating

Re-caulking the old seating

While the caulking was drying Bill started to renovate our original teak seating. After the trouble he’d had removing the little seat behind the wheel there was no way he was going to attempt to remove the main seating. It really didn’t need it. The teak was quite thick so Bill spent the rest of the day digging out the old caulking and removing the screw hole bungs (some of them had already fallen out). It was replaced with the same Sikaflex caulking he had used on the rest of the planking.

Our parcel from UPS

Our parcel from UPS

I spent the day cleaning the boat again getting rid of a layer of white dust that the sanding of the cockpit had produced.   Not sure why I bothered because the teak has got to be rubbed down in a few days time which create more dust. I had all but given up hope of my parcel arriving when word came from security that it had come over on the late ferry.   I went to collect it and realised why customs had held onto it so long; it looked like a missile launcher! CJ Marine had supplied some spare canvas along with our new sprayhood but had wrapped it up with the canvas still on the roll. It looked very strange.

Camomile's new bonnet

Camomile’s new bonnet

 

The wrapping was quickly removed and Camomile’s new bonnet was laid out on the pontoon, it looked brilliant. At first we thought they had forgotten to add the zipped window in the front that we had asked for but we discovered it under a Velcro fastening – very cleaver. Camomile was longing to try her sprayhood on but we wanted to wait until the woodwork was all finished before fitting it.

 

 

Top coat on the dinghy

Top coat on the dinghy

 

Tuesday 12th Bill gave the transom and bow of the dinghy a rub down and applied the topcoat. The triangular piece sitting on the workbench is the door to the bow locker. Tea bag is going to look very smart.

Getting it right

Getting it right

 

Bill continued working on the wood by trimming the adhesive that had hardened but stayed brown making a very neat edge.   The black caulking had also hardened and Bill trimmed that with a chisel. It then took him two days to plane it all to his liking. I spent most of my time down below inside the cabin.   The cockpit was covered in dust and it spread very easily. I’ve been going through cupboards and having a good sort out. There’s a giveaway table in the hard dock café and I put lots of things on there. The staff are allowed to help themselves so I know my things will get used.

Planing  the bridgehead

Planing the bridgehead

Re-fitting the engine start panel

Re-fitting the engine start panel

Wednesday 13th Bill gave the dinghy bow a coat of the non-slip granules then it was back to the working on the woodwork.   Once he’d finished we both cleared up.   The shavings were vacuumed up and the cockpit washed down. Bill does lots of little jobs in between the big ones. This is the starter panel being re-bedded in.  It looked superb and it’s not finished yet.   I think Bill will have to be renamed Bill the magician.

Bill the magician

Bill the magician

Removing screws

Removing screws

 

Thursday 14th Now Bill had the wood to his liking all the screws had to be removed. The holes were made bigger and filled with more homemade bungs using resin to fix them in place.

Bridgehead looking good.

Bridgehead looking good.

Bungs made out of scraps

Bungs made out of scraps

 

 

 

 

 

 

46

 

 

I got the sewing machine out to start making the covers for the dinghy wheels and outboard plus finish off the dinghy cover.

Rubbing everything down

Rubbing everything down

 

 

Friday 15th rub down the new wood, rub down the old seats, rub down the bridgehead, mess, mess, mess!

 

 

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Posted on May 15, 2015, in Port posts and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Lovely work and well documented. Cheers

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